March 2013 MinneCulture Archives

Veda Ponikvar is known as “The Iron Lady of Chisholm,” and recognized by the Historical Society as one of Minnesota’s 150 most important people. Born of humble beginnings to Eastern European immigrants on the Iron Range in northeastern Minnesota, Veda attended college, served in World War II, and returned to her hometown to start the Chisholm Free Press. She is a life-long advocate for workers, children and the mentally disabled. KFAI producer Britt Aamodt journeyed up north to talk to this 93-year-old icon.

To celebrate International Women’s Day on March 8, MinneCulture looks at some extraordinary women with Minnesota connections.

1. The Dead Feminists Society of Minnesota
The Dead Feminists Society of Minnesota began in 2008 as the brain-child of Kristine Holmgren and friends, who missed the collaborative efforts earlier feminist movements. They began organizing salons to address contemporary issues related to gender equality, justice for women and girls, equality in the workplace, relationships and more. The group honors the vision of American Feminism, and supports Minnesota feminists through initiatives that promote gender equality, dignity and fairness. Today the Dead Feminists Society of Minnesota has nearly 600 members and meets monthly at Barnes & Noble bookstore at Har Mar Mall in St. Paul. KFAI producer Dixie Treichel has more.

2. Author and historian Rhoda Gilman
Rhoda Gilman is a well known historian and author. In 2012 the Minnesota Historical Society published her book, “Stand Up! The Story of Minnesota’s Protest Tradition,” which details the state’s populist and progressive movements from Ignatius Donnelly to Floyd B. Olson and Hubert Humphrey. KFAI producer Britt Aamodt spoke to Gilman about her passion for history and politics.

3. Gender Justice
Gender Justice is a nonprofit organization that eliminates gender barriers through education programs, public policy advocacy and litigation. KFAI producer Dixie Treichel has more.

4. Stolen Childhoods
Stolen Childhods focuses on sex trafficking of underage girls – something that happens every day right here in Minnesota. Host Madeline Ramirez talked with Yvette Griffea­Gray of the Love Light Project, which provides support to girls who have become victims of commercial sexual exploitation.Griffea­ Gray says her involvement started when she saw a startling documentary.

5. The Chalice
The Chalice is a young hip-hop collective garnering accolades for dynamic music that champions female empowerment. The trio, featuring Lizzo, Sophia Eris and Claire de Lune, talks to KFAI’s Cyn Collins about how the band evolved, and what it’s like making music in a male-dominated genre.

Les Exodus has performed locally and nationally for 26 years, and remains one of the Twin Cities’ finest reggae bands. Tonight Live from Minnesota features Les Exodus at the Blue Nile, with Charles “Chilly” Petrus on keyboards, Lance Colmer on drums, Andy “Shoffman” Mark on bass. The charismatic vocal styles of singers Prince Jabba and Lynval Jackson complement the trio’s high-energy performance. Here is Les Exodus.

Les Exodus has performed locally and nationally for 26 years, and remains one of the Twin Cities’ finest reggae bands. Tonight Live from Minnesota features Les Exodus at the Blue Nile, with Charles “Chilly” Petrus on keyboards, Lance Colmer on drums, Andy “Shoffman” Mark on bass. The charismatic vocal styles of singers Prince Jabba and Lynval Jackson complement the trio’s high-energy performance. Here is Les Exodus.

This week on MinneCulture, live from Minnesota visits the Black Dog Coffee & Wine Bar in Lowertown St. Paul for When Poets Found Bass, a night of spoken word poetry presented by the Saint Paul Almanac. Featuring Saymoukda D. Vongsay, Fres Thao, Desdamona, Truthmaze and DJ Kool Akiem. Produced for KFAI by Daniel Zamzow. MinneCulture is made possible by a grant from the Minnesota Arts & Cultural Heritage Fund.

This week on MinneCulture, live from Minnesota visits the Black Dog Coffee & Wine Bar in Lowertown St. Paul for When Poets Found Bass, a night of spoken word poetry presented by the Saint Paul Almanac. Featuring Saymoukda D. Vongsay, Fres Thao, Desdamona, Truthmaze and DJ Kool Akiem. Produced for KFAI by Daniel Zamzow. MinneCulture is made possible by a grant from the Minnesota Arts & Cultural Heritage Fund.

Two diverse faiths: Minnesota’s Mindekirken and Tibetan Buddhism
Produced by Jessica Folker

Religion and language shape culture, so for immigrants coming to the United States, foreign tongues and unfamiliar worship services can be daunting. This audio documentary explores two religious communities in Minneapolis: the Norwegian Lutheran Memorial Church, or Mindekirken, and Tibetan Buddhists at the Gyuto Wheel of Dharma Monastery. Mindekirken is one of only two churches in the United States where Norwegian is the main language of worship. Founded 90 years ago in the Phillips neighborhood, the church has reinvented itself multiple times as the number of Norwegian immigrants to the Twin Cities has slowed to a trickle. But still the church draws worshipers—close to one hundred—many second, third and fourth generation Norwegian-Americans. Across town, young Tibetans at the Gyuto Wheel of Dharma Monastery and the Tibetan Community Center talk about keeping religious traditions alive while living in exile. Tibetans began arriving in the Minnesota in the 1990s, and today the Twin Cities has the second largest Tibetan population in the United States. Young adults explain what Buddhism means to them, how it’s different than their parents’ religion, and what the future holds for the next generation being raised as Tibetan, Buddhist and Minnesotan.

Two diverse faiths: Minnesota’s Mindekirken and Tibetan Buddhism
Produced by Jessica Folker

Religion and language shape culture, so for immigrants coming to the United States, foreign tongues and unfamiliar worship services can be daunting. This audio documentary explores two religious communities in Minneapolis: the Norwegian Lutheran Memorial Church, or Mindekirken, and Tibetan Buddhists at the Gyuto Wheel of Dharma Monastery. Mindekirken is one of only two churches in the United States where Norwegian is the main language of worship. Founded 90 years ago in the Phillips neighborhood, the church has reinvented itself multiple times as the number of Norwegian immigrants to the Twin Cities has slowed to a trickle. But still the church draws worshipers—close to one hundred—many second, third and fourth generation Norwegian-Americans. Across town, young Tibetans at the Gyuto Wheel of Dharma Monastery and the Tibetan Community Center talk about keeping religious traditions alive while living in exile. Tibetans began arriving in the Minnesota in the 1990s, and today the Twin Cities has the second largest Tibetan population in the United States. Young adults explain what Buddhism means to them, how it’s different than their parents’ religion, and what the future holds for the next generation being raised as Tibetan, Buddhist and Minnesotan.