General Announcements

Recently, the results of a two-year audit of St. Paul’s contracting of minority-owned businesses were released.

Summer is known as the season for blockbusters. Movie Talk recently hit the streets of the Twin Cities to get your take on what’s hot and what’s not this summer.

Despite Iran’s Supreme Leader’s demand for an end to protests, demonstrators show no signs of letting up. People continue to take to the streets, turn up at rallies and document the latest events taking place in the aftermath of the June 12th election. Tehran isn’t the only place where rallies in support of the Green Revolution are happening.

A new Surly brewery proposal is stalled by legislation that does not allow for on-sale service of alcohol at large breweries. Noel Clark has this story.

The Minnesota State Department of Health is investigating a mysterious neurological illness among workers at a pork processing plant in Austin Minnesota.

Longtime local peace and environmental activist, Susu Jeffrey, took exception to Colin Powell’s high profile presence on Martin Luther King Day. She had this commentary.

January 21, 2009

July 20, 2009, marks the 40th anniversary of the moon landing by the Apollo 11 crew. KFAI’s Britt Aamodt talked to Minneapolis illustration studio, Big Time Attic, whose book T-Minus: The Race to the Moon documents the US-Soviet space race of the 1960s to be the first country to land a man on the moon.

This story aired on Thursday, July 16, 2009.

An ongoing exhibit at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts features new work by Minnesota artist Ta-coumba Aiken.

Some grassroots organizations that lobby against net neutrality—the principle guiding a free and open internet— are funded by the internet and telecommunication industry. launched a campaign to expose these fake grass-roots organizations that they call Astroturf. KFAI’s Adam Spencer spoke with a representative of FreePress.


Minnesota made green history Tuesday in downtown Minneapolis. The Target Center is the first sports arena in the nation to have green roofing. The roof is 167 feet in the sky and can only be accessed through a series of elevators, staircases, and a ladder. The roof looks like a baseball field and will soon support Minneosta prairie plants, but it isn’t open to the public. KFAI reporter Ivan B.