Roots

Ron and Jean sat in for Ken this week. Of course songs about truck driving, train derailments, North Korean nuclear threats and very many examples of questionable marriage practices followed. Probably better you just listen to the archive and judge for yourself. (BTW, only two more weeks till Mr. Hippler returns.)

Karl digs into some newer Zydeco and then compares it to earlier Zydeco. Oh no! Compare and Contrast. Working at the University is starting to affect him.
Then Karl finally plays some Cajun for the last part of the show.

This week Radio Antilles goes LatinoAltROCK!, brought to you by Raúl Escobar, Pablo Miranda, and Emily. On this eclectic episode you will hear an interview with Local Artist deM atlaS. We have music from Uruguay/Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Spain plus brand new music from the Minneapolis Hip Hop Scene; including Common Labor, Crunchi Kids, Bomba De Luz, and Haphduzn & Dimitry Killstorm… They’ll get you jammin’ with everything from rock, reggae, punk, ska, hip-hop, samba, dance, indie, and fusions of many Latino and world sounds.
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Music Host: Bill Cottman
News Host: Yvette Howie
Producer: Dale Connelly

Lucky episode thirteen where nothing went wrong except some Relax-induced sleepiness.

Music Host: Mark Koerner
News Host: Paul Brohaugh
Producer: Dale Connelly
Engineer: Rico Morales

Two diverse faiths: Minnesota’s Mindekirken and Tibetan Buddhism
Produced by Jessica Folker

Religion and language shape culture, so for immigrants coming to the United States, foreign tongues and unfamiliar worship services can be daunting. This audio documentary explores two religious communities in Minneapolis: the Norwegian Lutheran Memorial Church, or Mindekirken, and Tibetan Buddhists at the Gyuto Wheel of Dharma Monastery. Mindekirken is one of only two churches in the United States where Norwegian is the main language of worship. Founded 90 years ago in the Phillips neighborhood, the church has reinvented itself multiple times as the number of Norwegian immigrants to the Twin Cities has slowed to a trickle. But still the church draws worshipers—close to one hundred—many second, third and fourth generation Norwegian-Americans. Across town, young Tibetans at the Gyuto Wheel of Dharma Monastery and the Tibetan Community Center talk about keeping religious traditions alive while living in exile. Tibetans began arriving in the Minnesota in the 1990s, and today the Twin Cities has the second largest Tibetan population in the United States. Young adults explain what Buddhism means to them, how it’s different than their parents’ religion, and what the future holds for the next generation being raised as Tibetan, Buddhist and Minnesotan.

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